Broadcast law amendments do not cover online porn, says the Heritage Minister



Ottawa-A full update of the Broadcast Act does not cover pornography or online sexual abuse content, said Heritage Minister Stephen Gilbo.

Guilbeault told the House Ethics Committee on Monday that the new regulator will deal with material that has no agreement with child pornography, but Bill C-10, which aims to regulate YouTube, Facebook, and other platforms, has content. He said he would avoid moderation. Porn.

He said the task was entrusted to a watchdog, which was inspired by the Australian Electronic Safety Commissioner and other watchdogs and is still in ongoing law.

Conservative and Democratic new lawmakers asked Gilbo why new regulators need to crack down on exploitative material when criminal law has already banned child pornography and the dissemination of illegal images. ..

Guilbeault says the current tools for dealing with online damage are “not adapted to the digital world” and need to be fixed.

Rampant child pornography and sexual exploitation on platforms such as Pornhub, the world’s largest porn site based in Montreal, have been scrutinized more and more since the New York Times opinion piece highlighted the issue in December. ..

Meanwhile, the Liberal Party managed to speed up the controversial bill C-10 and, with the support of Bloc Québécois, applied time allocation to the House Commission.

The move follows a similar attempt last week, when Conservative lawmakers used procedural manipulations to block the House of Representatives vote and put the bill on hold at a committee that has been reviewing bill C-10 since February. It is a thing. Media posting.

Bill C-10 demands that global online streaming giants such as Netflix be part of the Broadcasting Act to promote Canadian content and financially support the Canadian cultural industry.

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