Egyptian mummy parade Cairo in a procession of ancient rulers


Performers ride tanks at the start of a parade of 22 ancient royal mummies departing from the Egyptian Museum in Cairo's Tahrir Square-MAHMOUD KHALED / AFP

Performers ride tanks at the start of a parade of 22 ancient royal mummies departing from the Egyptian Museum in Cairo’s Tahrir Square-MAHMOUD KHALED / AFP

A procession of floats carrying the mummified debris of 22 pharaohs passed through Cairo on Saturday night to a new resting place.

The mummy ran four miles across the capital to the new National Museum of Egyptian Civilization.

The eye-catching procession, called the “Pharaoh’s Golden Parade,” was carried out by 18 kings and 4 queens in separate vehicles decorated in ancient Egyptian style, from oldest to newest.

But this week, superstitious Egyptians on social media suggested that moving mummies would curse their country.

They argued that there was a link between the planned parade and a series of recent disasters, including a week-long blockage of the Suez Canal, a fatal train wreck, and a fatal collapse of an apartment in Cairo.

Both pedestrians and vehicles were banned from Tahrir Square, where the current museum is located, and other sections of the route.

A & # xa0; Tank carrying one of the royal mummies-Jonathan Rashad / Getty Images

A tank carrying one of the royal mummies-Jonathan Rashad / Getty Images

Images of the opening ceremony, carefully choreographed as well as the smooth parade, were broadcast live on state television, with music and 21-gun salutes.

“This magnificent sight is a further proof of the greatness of a unique civilization that extends deep into history,” said President Abdelfatta Arsisi, shortly before the proceedings.

Seqenre Tao II, who ruled southern Egypt about 1600 years before Christ, the “hero” rode the first tank, and Ramses IX, who ruled in the 12th century BC, pulled up the rear.

Carriage carrying the mummy of Pharaoh Ramses IX-KHALED DESOUKI / AFP

Carriage carrying the mummy of Pharaoh Ramses IX-KHALED DESOUKI / AFP

Convoy of vehicles transporting royal mummies in Cairo-AP

Convoy of vehicles transporting royal mummies in Cairo-AP

Another great warrior, Ramses II, who ruled for 67 years, and Queen Hatshepsut, the most powerful female pharaoh, were also on a short voyage.

The National Museum of Egyptian Civilization will open its limited exhibition door from 2017 and will be fully open on Sunday, two weeks before the mummy is open to the public.

A carriage carrying the mummy of Queen Tiye, wife of Amenhotep III-KHALEDDESOUKI / AFP & # xa0;

A carriage carrying the mummy of Queen Tii, wife of Amenhotep III-KHALED DESOUKI / AFP

Within the next few months, the country plans to open another new showcase, The Grand Egyptian Museum, near the Pyramids of Giza.

It also houses the Pharaoh’s collection, which includes the famous treasures of Tutankhamun.

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