Has Albertsons stopped selling coconut milk covered by PETA?The grocery store doesn’t say


For over two years, animal welfare groups have pressured Albertsons to stop selling canned coconut milk from Thai companies where farmers choose coconuts from chained caged monkeys. I did.

On Friday, people for the ethical treatment of animals announced that Boise-based Albertsons and its subsidiary Safeway have stopped selling chao coconut milk. In a press release, PETA stated that Albertsons was following Costco, Target, Wegmans, Food Lion, Stop & Shop. These chains have stopped selling Chao Coconut Milk.

“Life as a chained coconut picker isn’t life at all for monkeys who need to play, eat and explore with their families,” said Tracy Rayman, executive vice president of PETA, in a release. I will. “PETA Exposé has confirmed the cover-up of atrocities on coconut farms, so conscientious grocery stores can’t keep Chaoko on the shelves.”

However, Albertsons Cos. It’s unclear if has actually stopped handling the brand. Albertsons spokesman Chris Wilcox did not comment in a telephone interview on Friday.

People for the ethical treatment of animals are calling on the American grocery chain to stop selling coconut milk made by the Thai company Chaokoh.  According to PETA, Chaoko is abusing the monkeys used to choose coconuts.

People for the ethical treatment of animals are calling on the American grocery chain to stop selling coconut milk made by the Thai company Chaokoh. According to PETA, Chaoko is abusing the monkeys used to choose coconuts.

PETA recently dispatched activists in monkey suits to dump hundreds of coconuts outside the 250 E. Parkcenter Blvd at Albertsons headquarters.It came a few months after the group I sent a box of coconut Albertsons CEO Vivek Sankaran and four company executives.

No Chao Coconut Milk was found on Friday’s shelves at the Albertsons Store on Boise’s 16th Avenue and State Street. The place that was November was full of other products. According to the company’s online ordering system “out of stock.”

PETA said it has conducted spot checks at Albertsons and Safeway stores nationwide over the past few weeks, including Boise, Oregon, Las Vegas, Portland, Eugene, and Albertsons stores in Huntington Beach, California.

The Safeway stores we visited were in Portland, Denver, Phoenix, Washington, DC, and Redding and San Jose, California.

Of the 15 stores PETA checked, only the Albertsons store on Boise’s Overland Road sold chao coconut milk. PETA spokesperson Moira Collie said in an email.

“In February, we started to notice that Chaokoh was out of stock or wasn’t listed on the Albertsons and Safeway websites,” Colley said. “We pointed this out to our executives and thanked them for not selling the product in the end, but we didn’t get a response.”

Protesters from people for the ethical treatment of animals dumped coconuts outside Albertsons' Boise headquarters. Stunts were part of a PETA campaign that pressured Albertsons to stop carrying chao coconut milk.  According to PETA, Thai companies use coconuts harvested by monkeys in chained cages.

Protesters from people for the ethical treatment of animals dumped coconuts outside Albertsons’ Boise headquarters. Stunts were part of a PETA campaign that pressured Albertsons to stop carrying chao coconut milk. According to PETA, Thai companies use coconuts harvested by chained monkeys and caged monkeys.

PETA conducted a survey and found that young monkeys were trained to choose coconuts on a Thai farm feeding Chaoko. PETA claimed that the monkeys were often chained, caged, and often mad because of the conditions in which they were kept.

The company behind Chaokoh, Theppadungporn Coconut Co., said it would require farmers and suppliers to sign contracts in response to protests. Promise to harvest coconut No animal labor. It hired a French auditing company, French Ship Classification Association, Monitor the farm.

Subsequent PETA studies found that producers were still using the monkey workforce. Animal rights groups said farmers provided monkeys only during the harvest and hired contractors to hide the monkeys until the auditor left.

“PETA has been asking Chaokoh for a farm list and warranty statement for over a year, but the company refused to share them,” Colley said.

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