Hearings of sexual misconduct represent a sad and cruel day for the Idaho Legislature


Scott McIntosh, Opinion Editor

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What a sad, shameful and cruel day for the Idaho Legislature!

The House Ethics Committee held a hearing to consider whether to recommend removal Accusation of sexually assaulting Congressman Aaron von Elinger, Republican Lewiston, and legislative volunteers..

Scott McIntosh is the Opinion Editor of the Idaho Legislature.

Scott McIntosh is the Opinion Editor of the Idaho Legislature.

The commission summoned a woman accusing von Elinger, and the testimony that hurt her intestines was difficult to hear.

Not only was it unnecessary to have her testify, but it did damage.

“Just before I came here, how can I explain that I was late because I panicked on the floor, vomited in the bathroom, and called my mom? How can I explain it to the committee?” Said, her voice is trembling. “But I don’t blame you. I forgive you. You do your job. And so do I.”

Von Elinger’s lawyer turned to victim blame and shame tactics.

Republican lawmakers were in the audience, ridiculing, laughing, and heckling. And some people in the audience actually chased the whistleblower by taking pictures and videos of her after she testified. This all happens after the far right part shares and identifies information about whistleblowers who are potential victims of sex crimes.

Wednesday was a sad, cruel, embarrassing, and embarrassing day for the Idaho Legislature, our editorial board wrote.

Victims of sexual assault must be protected rather than exposed to a political fire.

Taramalek

Taramalek

Former federal and state prosecutor Tara Marek explains why victims of sexual assault need to be protected. “Once a suspect or perpetrator is identified, the victim must go through a often difficult, embarrassing, traumatic process in the criminal justice system of regaining assault in order to bring the attacker to justice. . “

You can read the opinions of her guests here.

Armenian genocide

Boise's Joan Katizian tells the story of his mother, who was led to a death march during the 1915 Armenian Genocide, on Saturday, but only

Boysy’s Joan Katizian tells the story of his mother, who was led to a death march during the 1915 Armenian Genocide, on Saturday, where he was “saved” by the Turks in Aleppo, Syria, where he sold it to slaves. Was done. The stop after the death march was a mass execution, so she thought she was saved.

A small but active community of local Armenians in the Boisy region gathers each year on April 24 to commemorate the Armenian genocide in which an estimated 1.5 million Armenians were killed by the Ottoman Empire.

This year’s memorial on Saturday at the Anne Frank Memorial in Boise was different. That day, President Joe Biden issued a statement declaring the atrocities of 1915-1923 as “genocide.”

I was there for the Boise Ceremony, and it was a moving experience.

Critical race theory

Michael Carter, left, Jared Cutler

Michael Carter, left, Jared Cutler

Teaching critical racial theory is a hot topic, especially in Idaho. This week we received guest feedback from Jared Cutler, a former Idaho man who is now Vice President of Sinclair Community College in Ohio, and Michael Carter, Chief Diversity Officer at Sinclair, his colleague. It was.

You can read their thoughts here.

Analysis: By keeping silence, the Idaho Legislature loses its educational story

Idaho Board of Education President Debbie Krichfield (retired) and President-elect Kurt Levich (left) discuss at Idaho State Parliament during a live stream broadcast on Idaho Public Television on Thursday, April 22, 2021. Talk about freedom of expression and other topics that are being done.

Idaho Board of Education President Debbie Krichfield (retired) and President-elect Kurt Levich (left) discuss at Idaho State Parliament during a live stream broadcast on Idaho Public Television on Thursday, April 22, 2021. Talk about freedom of expression and other topics that are being done.

Two members of the Brad Little Board of Education, retiring President Debbie Krichfield and newly nominated President Kurt Levich, last week acknowledged the concerns of lawmakers’ social justice and downplayed the issue. I tried to balance. “I haven’t personally seen any evidence of systematic indoctrination,” Levich said at a press conference Thursday afternoon.

Unfortunately, they are a little late to join the discussion. The debate has been going on for some time and is already dominated by the anti-social justice side. Kevin Rechart of Aida Hoed News writes..

Idaho’s fringe politics threatens its ranking as the best place to live

Bob Kustra

Bob Kustra

Last year, Boise scored the highest score again in the ranking game. This time, Livability.com ranked number one among the 100 best places to live. We are amazed year by year as Boise continues to earn national honor as one of the best cities in the United States. Over the years, civic leadership, entrepreneurial innovation, and volunteer efforts have created a national topic about Boise, which has spread to the west and has followed its path to the east.

But it’s all threatened by the moves made by Idaho’s fringe politicians in Congress, Bob Kustra writes.

What you are saying

Letter to the editor

Letter to the editor

This week we received letters on critical racial theory, the Social Justice Program, President Biden’s first 100 days, Governor’s emergency authority, vaccines, Lieutenant Janice McGeetin’s Educational Task Force, and this session.

Click here to read these letters and more.

You can click here to submit a letter to the editor’s or guest’s opinion.

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