How do you deal with the heat and humidity in Miami?This is how “McKee” feels


What does a hot swamp look like? Please go out the front door and check.

Here in South Florida, we are used to humidity. But this is not the case. The temperature is around 90 degrees Celsius, the humidity in the air mixes with the storm … and there’s what’s called the Miami Misery Index. Sticky. I’m suffocating. I don’t like it.

“Our facility doesn’t have air conditioning, so working here is a bit petrified because we sweat like crazy,” said Jackie Medina, pool manager at Rockway Park in Westchester. I did. “We have a pool to cool off, so you can dive in and refresh at any time.”

Larry Abascar and his dog Sweet Pea cooled off June 21, 2021 off Howrover Beach in Miami-Dade, Florida. Many people trying to get rid of the heat and humidity went to the beach for sand and surfing.

Larry Abascar and his dog Sweet Pea cooled off June 21, 2021 off Howrover Beach in Miami-Dade, Florida. Many people trying to get rid of the heat and humidity went to the beach for sand and surfing.

On paper, 90 degrees may not look unusual on a summer day in South Florida. But when more things come in the last few days, it feels like three digits. National Weather Service meteorologist Paxton Fel can thank or even curse the heat index. After considering the humidity, it is “how it actually feels to the human body”.

On Sunday, it “feels” like 108, and the forecaster said close Issue an extreme heat warning. It went down a bit to 105 on Monday, but not so much on Tuesday.The heat index is forecast According to the National Meteorological Service, the first part of the week stays in three digits, with a maximum of 88 and a “mood” of 102.

On Monday, June 21, 2021, Reyjafe will skate at Howavera Skateboard Park, with high heat index temperatures throughout South Florida.

On Monday, June 21, 2021, Reyjafe will skate at Howavera Skateboard Park, with high heat index temperatures throughout South Florida.

So how do people feel about this? In a nutshell: sweat and breathe out.

The Bryson trailer sat in shorts and a T-shirt in the elevated porch shade of the Brickel City Center on Monday, removing the puff from the cigarette. On the last day of his vacation, a 31-year-old man from Ohio said he was looking for a pool or heading to the beach.

“It’s always hot here,” said the trailer. “But humidity is my kryptonite.”

Even near the nearby bayfront, sweat was poured from Isaac London’s face when he and his wife served customers on his food truck on Monday. But it’s hotter inside the truck.

According to 22-year-old London, a worldwide bistro food truck parked outside the market milkshake bar near Brickel Park can reach 140 degrees. On Monday, three people were working in a food truck with a big fan because the air conditioner broke.

Fans said, “It looks like the same hot air, but it helps.”

Trucks are usually parked near the park’s outdoor seating area daily from noon to 9 pm. He managed it for a year and a half. However, he noticed that sales were declining as the heat index rose.

“People don’t walk around much until 8 pm because it’s too hot to go out,” he said.

Andrew Garcia, 29, and Miguel Ortiz, 22, were chatting while sipping iced coffee, sitting at a picnic table near a row of food trucks under a fan near the park. Garcia from Hollywood and Ortiz from Orlando said they were breathlessly terrible, despite being familiar with the heat of South Florida.

“It’s hot outside like f —,” Garcia said with a laugh. “It’s really unpleasant and I can’t breathe.”

Ortiz and Garcia work at Kush By Spillover in Coconut Grove. They set up a table outside the restaurant, dressed in black with a tuck shirt. The heat can make their work intolerable.

“It’s weird because this past winter season was absolutely beautiful, and then suddenly … terrible heat … around 8am,” Garcia said.

Ortiz said he was drinking coffee outside because he needed a conversation. Sweaty, the two thanked the fans and tents along the bayfront in downtown Miami.

“Summer is approaching, but I didn’t expect it to get so hot,” Ortiz said.

On June 21, 2021, a fisherman with two girls wearing wide-brimmed hats, all shaded from the sun, goes fishing near the Howrover Sandbar in Miami-Dade, Florida.

On June 21, 2021, a fisherman with two girls wearing wide-brimmed hats, all shaded from the sun, goes fishing near the Howrover Sandbar in Miami-Dade, Florida.

However, Keisha Mosby, 41, said the heat had worsened the last time she visited Miami before and after Memorial Day 11 years ago. She sat on a few tables with her friends and ate burgers during the holidays. She didn’t escape the heat, but she said another friend fainted.

“This isn’t too bad,” she said. “It’s a little humid, but it’s comfortable for me.”

Miami Luxury Window Tinting employee Luis Rivas (left) installs window tinting on his car, and assistant Juan Perez (right) protects both from the scorching sun at Shoma Homes on the corner of Northwest 70th and 177th Avenues. Have a beach umbrella for, Monday, June 21, 2021, Palm Springs North, Miami. Window coloring is usually done in a closed area where workers are protected from the elements, but due to the pandemic, Rivas goes to the customer and involves working outdoors. Exposed to heat and humidity.

Miami Luxury Window Tinting employee Luis Rivas (left) installs window tinting on his car, and assistant Juan Perez (right) protects both from the scorching sun at Shoma Homes on the corner of Northwest 70th and 177th Avenues. Have a beach umbrella for, Monday, June 21, 2021, Palm Springs North, Miami. Window coloring is usually done in a closed area where workers are protected from the elements, but due to the pandemic, Rivas goes to the customer and involves working outdoors. Exposed to heat and humidity.

According to meteorologist Fel, tropical cyclone claudets aren’t directly due to high heat indices, but South Florida has gained some moisture from the end of the storm.

June Historically According to Brian McNordi, a senior researcher at the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Miami, the heat index has the highest value.

“We actually reached a heat index of 107.4 degrees twice last year. This is the highest measured in the year. Regardless of the nuance of a tenth degree, here the heat index is 105. It’s very rare to go overboard, “McNoldy said in an email.

The very hot Sunday was “only one day,” McNordi said, and he didn’t expect to see more of these extremes this year. But he said we should expect more high-temperature records to be broken as climate change changes.

On the other hand, this week’s heat and humidity are more than just unpleasant. It can be dangerous.

“Be careful if you’re feeling the effects of heat stress,” said Jane Gilbert, “Chief Heat Officer” in Miami-Dade County. “Get liquids, water and electrolytes and go in or out of the shade to let the heat escape as much as possible.”

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