Mexico’s vaccine campaign faces problems, success


Mexico City (AP) —Mexico President condemns criticism of the country’s coronavirus vaccination efforts on Tuesday for conservative opponents or moody “elderly people complaining about not wanting to be vaccinated” Rejected a pair of scandals as a job.

Despite some success (for example, all shots are free), there are problems with the deployment of non-uniform vaccines in countries that employ vaccines from different quality vaccination sites and half a dozen different manufacturers. there was.

The first round of vaccination in Mexico is aimed at healthcare professionals, and the current second round is aimed at people over the age of 60.

After an 84-year-old man had a heart attack and waited in line for hours outside one vaccination station in northern Coahuila, at least three were fainted and the man was empty at another center outside Mexico City. I got stuck with a needle. Mexico City.

While some wealthy areas offer short lines of well-tested vaccines at shaded vaccine centers, older people in other poor and suburban areas spend hours sunbathing. You are forced to line up or receive a poorly documented vaccine.

That is a problem for the president, who has the slogan “The poor come first.”

Mexico has more vaccines than many Latin American countries, with about 15 million doses and about 9.3 million vaccines so far, second only to Brazil and Chile. ..

However, the development is also characterized by significant inequality. Mexico currently uses at least six vaccines manufactured by various manufacturers, some of which have published complete data on their efficacy, and some of which have not.

The government uses two Chinese vaccines manufactured by Sinovac and Sinopharm, but has not published its own data on their effectiveness.

For example, residents of the two wealthiest districts of the country, Las Lomas de Chapultepec and Polanco, have obtained well-tested and effective Pfizer vaccines. In other poor areas, AstraZeneca or Chinese vaccines are mixed.

Last week, at the vaccination center in the upper middle class of Rome, the lines were relatively short and volunteers guided the elderly quickly and politely, sometimes within an hour.

At the city’s Bus Conceros Library, which serves poor areas, long lines meandered through tanned parking lots and spilled onto the streets outside. The user reported waiting for the shot for more than 2 hours. Both centers used the AstraZeneca vaccine, which is facing doubts in Europe about its potential association with blood clots.

Obviously, not all experiences in poor areas were bad, and not all experiences in rich areas were good. However, the report of the incident seemed to have caused the president’s anger.

Over the weekend, a nurse trainee at a vaccination station on the outskirts of Mexico City filmed an old man tapping his arm with an empty syringe and immediately pulling it out without injecting anything.

Nursing colleges and local governments quickly described it as a simple mistake. They said the volunteers understood what had happened and corrected it by injecting him with the dose he was supposed to receive.

However, President Andrés Manuel Lopez Obrador sees almost all criticisms as attacks by enemies who describe him as “conservative,” but suggested that the situation was planned to slander him.

“There are only two explanations, whether it was a virtual error or a setting intended to hurt us. I will not rule it out because of the coverage it received,” Lopez of Lador said on Tuesday.

Long waits to get vaccinated in Torreon, northern city of Coahuila, after President Hugo Morales of the State Human Rights Commission confirmed last week that a 84-year-old man had a heart attack after waiting. Floated in. 3 hours in the sun to get a shot.

According to Morales, the commission recorded three elderly people who fainted after waiting hours in the sun at a vaccination center in the same city on March 29.

“The elderly were waiting in line for six hours,” Morales said. He said the man who had a heart attack was in critical but stable condition.

Morales has proposed to federal authorities implementing the vaccine program to provide shelter for the sun and water to those in line, but as of this week, to address the situation. He said nothing seemed to be done.

“They aren’t doing anything at all,” he said. “There is no sunshade or hydration station.”

Most of the vaccination campaigns reflect the previous trends of the Lopez Obrador administration, like his frustration in the face of criticism.

The president has outsourced most of the vaccination logistics to the military. This is what he has done on most of his major projects since taking office in late 2018.

The president also set aside the private sector, which makes up the majority of Mexico’s healthcare, and even if private hospitals and drugstore chains are well-equipped and deployed to handle some of the vaccines to date. Vaccination in favor of having the government handle the entire vaccination effort.

Lopez Obrador has been declared a fan of big government solutions in most parts of the economy, and this trend has led him to conflict with private companies in the energy and construction sectors.

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