Mexico’s wealthiest man rebuilds and pays for a collapsed subway


Mexico City (AP) —Mexico’s wealthiest man promises to rebuild and pay for part of Mexico City’s subway line that collapsed in May, killing 26 people and Andrés Manuel Lopez Obrador The president said on Wednesday.

Lopez Obrador said telecommunications and construction tycoon Carlos Slim has promised to pay for the rebuild from his pocket and resume service within a year. One of his companies originally built many of the sections where the collapse took place.

“He will be in charge of the overall reconstruction, taking care to ensure that it is safe enough, without spending money on the public,” said the president.

“He promised to pay all the money,” Lopez Obrador said. “He’s not going to wait for the legal issue to be resolved, so after a year he can back it up and make it work again for the benefit of the general public.”

One of Slim’s companies built a problematic section of the subway, primarily on Line 12. Slim denied the construction flaw, but an investigation by an external certification company cited poor welding of the studs that join the steel support beams to the concrete layer that supports the trackbed.

The city government hired a Norwegian certification company, DNV, to investigate the possible causes of the May 3 accident. In this accident, the span of the elevated line buckled on the ground and two subway cars were dragged in.

The report stated that apparently there were not enough studs and the concrete poured over them could be defective. Welding between the stretches of the steel beams also seems to be poor.

The presence of construction flaws when the line was built between 2010 and 2012 could have a major impact on the political career of Slim and then mayor of Mexico’s top diplomat Marcelo Evrad. ..

Another investigation will be undertaken and the criminal investigation has not yet been prosecuted.

Prior to resigning as mayor in 2012, there have been reports of nearly a decade of rushing completion of the project by current diplomatic secretary Evlard to open subway line 12.

The collapse was also embarrassing for Slim, now the wealthiest man in Mexico and once the wealthiest in the world. Slim is a trained engineer and his company is currently involved in building some of the controversial Maya Train projects around the Yucatan Peninsula.

The proposal that his company did a crude job on the subway would seriously hurt his reputation as a kind of senior politician in the Mexican business community.

Many routes have been closed since the May accident. The elevated section of the track is about 16 feet (5 meters) above the median strip and driveway in the poor southern part of Trauak. The thin, reinforced concrete columns are covered with horizontal steel beams. The beams support the concrete track floor on which gravel, sleepers and tracks are laid.

Serving 4.6 million passengers daily, the Mexico City subway didn’t have one of the most needed. It’s money. Tickets are priced at only 25 cents per ride, one of the lowest in the world, so the system stays away from paying its own costs and relies on huge government subsidies. I will.

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