NASA’s Orion returns haunting new views of the Moon’s warped surface


Orion captured this view of the Moon on Day 6 of the Artemis 1 mission.

Orion captured this view of the Moon on Day 6 of the Artemis 1 mission.

The Moon is a cold, dead, desolate place, as these new images from NASA’s Orion prove.

Last Monday, Unattended Artemis 1 Capsule It was conducted The first of two course-correcting maneuvers required to enter a distant retrograde orbit. It was during this course correction that Orion made its closest approach to the Moon, coming within 80 miles (130 kilometers) of her surface. Naturally, NASA had the opportunity to take many cool photos. release yesterday.

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bumpy limbs

Image: NASA

Image: NASA

The image was taken on day 6 of the Artemis 1 mission, an unmanned demonstration of NASA’s Orion capsule.

Moon topology

Image: NASA

Image: NASA

Huge New Space Launch System (SLS) Rocket blown away Launched from Kennedy Space Center on November 16, Orion returned on its 25.5-day journey to the Moon.

crater within crater within crater

The pockmarked surface of the moon as seen from the constellation Orion.

The pockmarked surface of the moon as seen from the constellation Orion.

Orion used its on-board optical navigation camera to capture grayscale images of the Moon, showing an extensive collection of craters, the most prominent feature of our natural satellites. Indeed, it’s miles of craters, and the image even shows a crater within a crater within a crater.

1 of 16 cameras

Image: NASA

Image: NASA

Orion’s optical navigation camera one of the 16 people on board the spacecraftThe camera not only captures images, but also helps Orion navigate. This is done by capturing images of the Earth and Moon, at various phases and distances. As NASA notes, the images taken by the optical navigation camera can be used “effectively under a variety of lighting conditions as a way to help orient the spacecraft on future missions with crew members. provide a “hardened data body” to prove the identity.

Earth’s surface created over 4 billion years

Image: NASA

Image: NASA

The Moon formed more than 4 billion years ago and is thought to be the result of a Mars-sized object colliding with Earth. Since our natural satellites have no atmosphere and minimal surface activity, the Moon simply collects craters over time.researcher Quote About 225 new impact craters appear about every seven years.

back to the moon

Image: NASA

Image: NASA

through it Ambitious Artemis ProjectThe ongoing Artemis 1 mission is intended to set the stage for its recurring mission, Artemis 2, but Orion I admire the astronauts on board. This sequel mission is currently scheduled for 2024.

wave to apollo

Image: NASA

Image: NASA

After completing the outbound flyby burn, Orion passed approximately 1,400 miles (2,200 km) above the Apollo 11 landing site at Tranquility Base. It then flew over the Apollo 14 site at an altitude of approximately 6,000 miles (9,700 km) and then flew over the Apollo 12 site at an altitude of approximately 7,700 miles (12,400 km). according to to NASA.

Destination: Distant retrograde orbit

Image: NASA

Image: NASA

Orion is currently on its way to a distant retrograde orbit (DRO) around the Moon. A spacecraft in this very stable orbit moves very far from the surface of the Moon at its farthest point and moves around the Moon in the opposite direction that the Moon orbits the Earth (i.e. retrograde orbit). .

outbound speedster

Image: NASA

Image: NASA

Orion should perform a second course correction operation on Friday, November 25 at 4:52 PM ET. This burning moves Orion into a far-away retrograde orbit, where it stays for about a week. The spacecraft is currently navigating abundant orbits at speeds reaching 5,102 mph (8,211 km/hr).

Have a good time here, not for long

Image: NASA

Image: NASA

Orion is scheduled to leave the lunar environment on December 1st and return to Earth on December 11th.

we will be back

Image: NASA

Image: NASA

The first two Artemis missions are the predecessors to Artemis 3, where NASA will attempt to land a man and a woman on the moon. The mission is currently scheduled for 2025, But that likely won’t happen until 2026 Or later.

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