Peruvian presidential election final vote is too close


On June 7, 2021, the day after the final vote, left-wing Pedro Castillo, a presidential candidate for the Peruvian Libre Party, flutters the flag on the balcony of Lima's party headquarters. --Right-wing populist Keiko Fujimori wins the Peruvian presidential election on Monday. However, the races in the crisis-stricken country were too close, as the races in the crisis-stricken country were still counted from the rural forts in favor of the radicals. Left-wing Pedro・ Castillo. More than 95% of the votes have been aggregated, and the outcome of the final vote is still unknown.  (Photo by Luka GONZALES / AFP) (Photo by LUKA GONZALES / AFP via Getty Images) *** BESTPIX *** ORG XMIT: 0 ORIG FILE ID: 1233321481

On June 7, 2021, the day after the final vote, left-wing Pedro Castillo, presidential candidate for the Peruvian Libre Party, flutters the flag on the balcony of Lima’s party headquarters. –Right-wing populist Keiko Fujimori is the president of Peru on Monday. Although he held a close lead in the election, the races in the crisis-stricken country were too close to vote, as they were still counted from the rural fortresses in favor of the radical leftist Pedro Castillo. More than 95% have been aggregated, and the result of the final vote is still unknown. (Photo by Luka GONZALES / AFP) (Photo by LUKA GONZALES / AFP via Getty Images) *** BESTPIX *** ORG XMIT: 0 ORIG FILE ID: 1233321481

Lima, Peru (AP) — A beginner who became a politician from a rural teacher, the daughter of a former president who was imprisoned was voted on Monday as a coronavirus pandemic continued to attack the Andean country. Exchanged leads in close quarters over Peru’s presidency.

According to official results, 94% of ballots were aggregated, with leftist Pedro Castillo at 50.07% and conservative Keiko Fujimori at 49.92%. For Fujimori, this is his father’s third presidential election in the 1990s.

The figures released by the Peruvian electoral body, the National Election Process Bureau, included almost all votes cast near the national election processing center. The agency was still waiting for votes from remote rural areas and abroad.

“No one knows who will win at this point,” Fernando Tuesta, a political scientist at the University of Peruvian Catholic University and former chairman of the Election Commission in Peru, told a local radio station. Pedro Pablo Kuczynski defeated Fujimori by only 42,597 votes.

Fujimori’s support was expected to come from voters in the capital Lima and other urban areas, but Castillo’s support is in the local community.

Neither candidate made any statement on Monday. Castillo left Takabamba in the Andes early and headed for Lima.

More: Unable to find a vaccine at home, wealthy Latin Americans head to the United States to get vaccinated against COVID-19

Polarized populist candidates put coronavirus vaccine on all and other strategies to mitigate health emergencies that have killed more than 180,000 people and put millions in poverty in Peru I promise. The election more than doubled the number of deaths from COVID-19 previously admitted by the authorities, following a revision of statistics by the Peruvian government.

Voters throughout Peru, who are required to vote, headed for voting throughout Sunday under a set schedule to minimize long queues. No turmoil was reported even at a polling place in San Miguel del Ene, a remote village in the cocaine-producing region. The massacre ended two weeks ago, killing 16 people.

Pre-election polls have shown that candidates are virtually tied towards the final vote. In the first poll of 18 candidates, neither received more than 20% of support, and both were strongly opposed by the Peruvian social sector.

Lucia Karion, a street vendor in Lima, said, “Candidates to be either Keiko or Pedro (to become president) have only to accept it, but they govern well. “There is a lot of corruption. One of them has to stop as much corruption as it is here in Peru.”

The pandemic not only burdened Peru’s medical and cemetery infrastructure, but also left millions of unemployed and highlighted Peru’s long-standing inequality. It has also deepened people’s distrust of the government as it mismanageds its response to the new coronavirus infection and the secret vaccination campaign for influential people has evolved into a national scandal.

In protest and alleged corruption, South American countries replaced three presidents in November. Some analysts have warned that this election could be a new turning point in people’s boiling frustration and lead to political instability.

More: Peru’s interim president resigns as the nation falls into crisis

After the ballot, President Francisco Sagasty said candidates should respect the results and ask believers to refrain from protesting the results. Fujimori is cautious of his followers because “the margin is very small.” Meanwhile, Castillo demanded a review of all ballots to “guarantee the true public will of the Peruvian people.”

Former MP Fujimori has promised people various bonuses, including a one-time payment of $ 2,500 to each family with at least one COVID-19 victim. She also has minerals, oil, or We proposed to distribute 40% of the gas mining tax to families living near those areas.

Keiko Fujimori herself was later released but imprisoned as part of an investigation into corruption. Her father, Alberto Fujimori, ruled from 1990 to 2000 and was sentenced to 25 years in prison for corruption and the killing of 25 people. She promised to release him if she won.

Until recently, Castillo was a rural teacher in the country’s third poorest district, deep in the Andes. The son of an illiterate peasant entered politics with a teacher strike. Although his stance on nationalizing major sectors of the economy has softened, he remains committed to rewriting the constitution approved under Fujimori’s father’s administration.

Both candidates oppose abortion and same-sex marriage.

Peru is the world’s second-largest copper exporter, with mining accounting for nearly 10% of GDP and 60% of exports, so Castillo’s first proposal to nationalize the country’s mining was among business leaders. I rang the alarm bell. But investors will remain cautious regardless of who was elected to replace Sagasty on July 28.

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Garcia Cano reported from Mexico City.

This article was originally published in USA TODAY. Peruvian presidential election final vote is too close

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