Pilot view is blocked and alerts are missing in a plane crash


Washington (AP) —Pilot of two Alaskan tourist planes that collided in the air could not see other planes due to the structure of the plane or passengers obstructing their view, and there was no safety system, so nearby planes Did not receive an electronic alert about. It’s working properly.

It was found by National Transportation Safety Board staff in a May 2019 crash investigation, killing six people.

The board will meet in Washington on Tuesday to identify possible causes of the crash and make recommendations to prevent a recurrence.

Mountain Air Service pilot Randy Sullivan and his four passengers, as well as passengers on a Taquan Air-owned plane, were killed. Ten people were injured when the aircraft converged to 3,350 feet (1,021 meters).

A Ketchikan-based floatplane carrying passengers from the same cruise ship, the Royal Princess, has returned from a tour of the Misty Fjords National Monument.

Mountain Air’s single-engine De Havilland DHC-2MK 1 Beaver and Takuan’s larger turboprop De Havilland DHC-3 Otter collided on the west side of the George Inlet shortly after noon.

Staff told the board that they remembered the otter pilot seeing white and red flashes and a tremendous clash.

The aircraft relies on pilots to “see and avoid” to prevent mid-air collisions, staff said. However, the crash occurred on a sunny afternoon.

The Beaver pilot’s view would have been obstructed by the structure of the plane and the passengers sitting to his right at a critical moment before the crash. The otter pilot’s view was hidden by window stanchions, staff said.

William Bramble, a Human Performance Specialist at the NTSB, said both planes were equipped with a system to track the other plane, but visual and auditory alerts were not working on either plane due to a malfunction. I told the meeting.

“The otter pilot seemed to miss the target (the other plane) on the display because he last remembered seeing the display about four minutes before the collision,” said Bramble.