Scientists Strap Cameras to Navy Dolphins and Capture Something Terrifying


Photo Illustration by Kelly Caminero/The Daily Beast/Getty

Photo Illustration by Kelly Caminero/The Daily Beast/Getty

At the risk of prematurely awarding titles, I think I have discovered the strangest research published in 2022. Scientists secured her GoPro cameras to the bodies of six of her U.S. Navy-trained dolphins, recording them foraging and gruesomely eating their prey. detail. According to the study, there was a purpose behind this potential dolphin invasion of privacy. That is, learning more about how mammals hunted and ate.

Scientists have so far put forward two competing hypotheses about how dolphins eat. They engaged in ram feeding where the predator swam faster than the prey and grabbed the fish with its jaws as it overtook it. Or suck feeding, in which the predator moves its tongue to widen its throat to create negative pressure and swallow its prey whole. The study authors published in the magazine on Wednesday pro swanset out to determine which method the dolphins actually used.

“[S]”Sound and video have never been used together to observe the behavior of dolphins and the live fish they capture and consume,” they wrote in the study.

And, of course, there’s the fact that these dolphins were trained by the U.S. Navy. before 1960, when Navy researchers studied dolphins to try to improve their torpedo designs.Since then, they have spent millions of dollars each year on upbringing and training bottlenose dolphins and California sea lionsAccording to the program’s website, these animals “have excellent low-light vision and underwater directional hearing, allowing them to detect and track subsea targets even in dark or murky waters.”

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Still, the existence of naval programs that train dolphins to identify targets such as deep sea mines doesn’t explain why this study was conducted. Because a certain Sam Ridgeway died. early this year, never seems to know the answer to this pressing question. Instead, attention should be paid to the text of the study itself, written as informatively as dolphin fanfiction, which shows how his GoPro footage of a three-headed dolphin hunt looked and how A passage that describes what you heard.

“The calls continued while the dolphins grabbed, manipulated and swallowed their prey. During the capture, the dolphin’s lips flared, exposing almost all of its teeth, and its throat flared outwards. It seemed to be.”

— Ridgeway et al.

The camera angle presents a side-eye view of a dolphin, something we’ve never seen before and want to see again.Upon closer inspection it is clear that these are not Idyllic Lisa Frank’s Dolphins; these are Terrifying, nightmare-inducing Roman dolphins You seem to crave the thrill of chasing. The study, his 330th peer-reviewed article for the Marine Mammal Program, details how dolphins “turned it out” when they identified their next target. Their heartbeats can now be heard in recordings.

It’s important to remember that the footage in this pseudo-horror movie had a scientific purpose. Researchers found that most of the time, dolphins suck-feed rather than feed rams. “I was amazed at the ability of all the dolphins to open their upper and lower lips to inhale food,” they wrote.

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Wait a second! GoPro also caught a never-before-seen dolphin eating a sea snake. The dolphin clicked as it approached the snake, then twitched its head some more and inhaled.

you’re welcome.

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