The Egyptians are afraid of the “curse of the pharaoh” as the all-star mummy parades in Cairo.


The mummified ruins of Queen Hatshepsut, the most famous female pharaoh in ancient Egypt, are one of the parades on the streets of Cairo this weekend-CRIS BOURONCLE & # xa0; / AFP

The mummified ruins of Queen Hatshepsut, the most famous female pharaoh in ancient Egypt, are one of the parades on the streets of Cairo this weekend-CRIS BOURONCLE / AFP

Egypt will host a “Golden Parade” this weekend, comparable to a royal funeral, to move the ancient Pharaoh’s mummies to Cairo’s new showcase museum.

The preserved ruins of 18 kings and 4 queens over 3,000 years ago will be stylized on the streets of the capital from 6 pm on Saturday, with a salvo of fireworks, fanfare and shooting in honor. It will be processed with a gold barge.

However, superstitious Egyptians on social media have suggested that moving mummies would curse their country.

They argued that there was a link between the planned parade and a recent series of disasters, including: A week-long blockage of the Suez Canal, A fatal train wreck and a fatal collapse of an apartment in Cairo.

Among the mummies being moved were Ramses II (reigned from 1279 to 1213 BC), his father Seti I (1290 to 1279 BC), and Amenhotep I’s sister and wife, Queen Meritamen (BC). From 1526 to 1506). ), Said the Egyptian Ministry of Tourism.

The royal mummy, with its skin, hair, nails and original wrapping preserved, was discovered in Luxor by archaeologists in the 1890s and later moved to the Egyptian Museum on Tahrir Square in Cairo.

They are a new gallery of the National Museum of Egyptian Civilizations in Fustat, Old Cairo, designed to emulate the Valley of the Kings in Luxor, where the royal family was first buried, from the current house built in 1902. Will be carried to. ..

The new museum will showcase the ruins in a climate-controlled environment, along with the original sarcophagus, to aid in conservation.

The new Egyptian National Civilization Museum in Cairo will open this year-KHALED DESOUKI & # xa0; / AFP

The new Egyptian National Civilization Museum in Cairo will open this year-KHALED DESOUKI / AFP

President Abdelfatta Arsisi has invested heavily in a multi-million-pound tourism “megaproject”, including the new Grand Egyptian Museum next to the Pyramids of Giza, to house the ruins and treasures of Tutankhamun. (1334 to 1325 BC). ).

Both museums are scheduled to open this year in the hope of boosting the tourism industry, which has been hit by the country’s pandemic.

The ruins of the royal family have been seen by millions of visitors, but their shallow cheek faces and the grinning spectacle of Rictus are not suitable for the timid.

Archaeologist and former minister Zahi Hawass recalled that Queen Margaret, the Queen’s sister, was among her former visitors.

“I will never forget when I took Margaret to the museum,” he said.

“There was a Ramses II mummy in the gallery … (Princess Margaret) closed her eyes and ran away-she couldn’t stand it,” she added what she saw before her.

Ancient Egyptian King Seqenre Tao II

Mummy of the ancient Egyptian King Seqenre Tao II “Brave” who ruled southern Egypt around 1600 BC-AFP

The Royal Mummy transfer has surpassed Egypt’s list of internet searches recorded by Google this week, but it’s not always a positive reason.

Tourism and Antiquities Minister Halled Al Anani promised that the live television parade would be “a unique, world-class epic event befitting the grandeur of our great ancestors.”

However, morbid jokes and rumors are widespread on social media that the “curse of the pharaoh” may be the cause of a series of bad events in Egypt.

This includes the Suez Canal crisis. Blockade by Evergiven container ship for nearly a week – same as Fatal train wreck in Sohag It killed almost 20 people, and 18 people were killed in several fires and the collapse of Cairo’s apartment.

Many cite ancient warnings found in King Tutankhamun’s tomb. “Death will come soon for those who disturb the king’s peace.”

However, experts struggled to dispel thoughts about the link between the mummy parade and recent events.

Salima Ikram, a professor of Egyptology at American University in Cairo, said: “It makes things much more dramatic.”

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