The proposed South Beach 2:00 am is the last unpopular call among club owners and resident activists.


Proposals to ban the sale of alcohol on South Beach after 2 am can go too far or over, depending on who you ask.

Steve Policer, a lawyer representing several bars and restaurants, said he would pull up his last call from 5 am, when Mayor Dan Gelber suggested on Tuesday in the midst of a difficult spring break dropout. He said he would effectively impose a “death sentence” on Miami Beach’s world-famous nightlife scene. Located on Ocean Drive and Washington Avenue.

He said the city should use a scalpel instead of a hammer to cure what afflicts South Beach.

“It should be a last resort,” he said of his last call at 2 am.

But for resident activists like former commissioner Kristen Rosen Gonzalez, who recently helped organize anti-nightlife protests outside the city hall, more dramatic changes are needed. Maybe the last call in the entertainment district is at 10pm.

“The curfew has been issued for the past year, but the problem has not been resolved,” Rosen Gonzalez said of the county-wide COVID-19 curfew, which has been in force since July. Did.

Miami Beach residents will meet outside the City Hall to protest the treatment of the city during Spring Break on Saturday, March 27, 2021.

Miami Beach residents will meet outside the City Hall to protest the treatment of the city during Spring Break on Saturday, March 27, 2021.

Gerber’s proposed ban on liquor is one of 12 policy proposals outlined in Tuesday’s memo, including a carve-out for companies with good security and a “good record of compliance.” The 12-point plan could also upgrade land-use regulations in the entertainment district to promote residential and office use, remove the two-block ocean drive noise exemption, and place more police in the entertainment district. I am proposing.

“For now, I think the place is a projection of what it is to the world,” Gerber said. “We need to project something else.”

More specific details of the proposal have not been revealed, but the three major South Beach strips (Ocean Drive, Collins Avenue, and Washington Avenue 5th to 16th Avenues) are part of Gerber’s plan or He told Miami Herald that it would be all affected.

Alcohol cutoffs will help cities plan themselves as more mellow destinations, Gerber said. The project was preliminaryly supported by Jonathan Zik, owner of the Betsy Hotel and chairman of the Ocean Drive Association. Gerber said the city has “the right to define what the region should be” and is not naive to have critics in every plan.

In July he Proposed alcohol cutoff at 12:00 am, Elimination of noise relief and zoning reform to promote district development. The midnight cutoff failed, the exemption became stricter but not removed, and the zoning changes have not yet been voted.

The committee, which is divided according to how to handle the nightlife scene, will meet next April 21st. Gerber, one of the board’s seven votes, instructed city officials to create a legislative package from his 12-. Point plan to present to the commissioner.

“2 am [rollback] It’s not a silver bullet, but a mosaic of ideas creates a sense of another place, “Gerber said. “It’s not a hard party area. It’s a live work play area.”

Beachers will leave Ocean Drive when police enforce a curfew for spring break at 8 pm on Friday, March 26, 2021 in Miami Beach, Florida.

Beachers will leave Ocean Drive when police enforce a curfew for spring break at 8 pm on Friday, March 26, 2021 in Miami Beach, Florida.

Club Owners, Residents-Activists Different Ways To Fix South Beach

But both the club owners and their biggest critics agree on one thing. Gelber’s 2am cutoff is ineffective at curbing crime, improving the quality of business, or repairing the tense reputation of South Beach.

Since 2015, the city has been calling for a sidewalk cafe at 2 am. And since July, the county’s COVID curfew has effectively acted as a 12 am alcohol cutoff. Still, a noisy crowd filled the streets and gave the city hall a headache. During the spring break, police were so overwhelmed that the city imposed a curfew at 8 pm in the red-light district of South Beach, which remains valid on weekends.

“We don’t have the money. We don’t have enough police to get out of it,” Rosen Gonzalez said.

She needs to take advantage of the disgusting inhabitant’momentum’built to pass stricter restrictions, such as the committee not renewing sidewalk cafe permits until the city plans to reform the area. Said there is. While many companies, including “good operators,” suffer, she said drastic action is needed.

“There will be casualties, and that’s sad,” she said.

Miami Beach residents and city officials commented on his view of a recent spring break event on the beach by resident and business owner Mitchnovic, 56, during a listening session hosted by the Miami-Dade County Community Relations Board. I talk.  (CRB) Art Deco Welcome Center on Ocean Drive, Miami Beach, Florida, Tuesday, March 30, 2021. Novic is a resident of Miami Beach and owns and operates the Sherbrooke Hotel.

Miami Beach residents and city officials commented on his view of a recent spring break event on the beach by resident and business owner Mitchnovic, 56, during a listening session hosted by the Miami-Dade County Community Relations Board. I talk. (CRB) Art Deco Welcome Center on Ocean Drive, Miami Beach, Florida, Tuesday, March 30, 2021. Novic is a resident of Miami Beach and owns and operates the Sherbrooke Hotel.

Mitchnovic, an activist and some owner of the Sherbrooke Hotel on Collins Avenue, said Gerber’s plans feature recycled ideas that don’t address the South Beach outdoor party problem. He recommends taking a sidewalk cafe from the street and turning off the music on Ocean Drive.

He Cost-benefit analysis Conducted by a city consultant who showed that the red-light district of South Beach posted a $ 6 million deficit between 2017 and 2018. According to a study by Lambert Advisory, the city’s costs in the area (police, fire, emergencies, sanitation services, etc.) were $ 6.4 million higher than the income generated in the area.

“Taxpayers are fully funded in this area,” he said.

While a group of voice residents and activists are calling for a crackdown on the nightlife industry 2017 voters rejected the proposed 2:00 am last call With an ocean drive with a margin of almost 2-1.

The vote revealed that the public did not support rollbacks, Clevelander South Beach lawyer Alexander Takumes wrote in a letter to the Miami Herald.

Tachmes said the last call at 2am “unjustly” targeted South Beach facilities such as the Clevelander and Mango’s Tropical Cafe, and other late-night hangouts elsewhere in the city at 5am. Said that it will be provided free of charge.

“Clevelander strongly supports the city’s proposal, which is logical and focuses on the real problem at hand,” he writes. “It’s a terrible mistake to target a company like us that has been promoting fun, safe and comprehensive entertainment for decades.”

Mango tropical cafe on Ocean Drive.

Mango tropical cafe on Ocean Drive.

Mango’s COO Josh Wallack said on his last call that he opposes the 2:00 am blanket but expects to be exempt from the order given the club’s legacy and achievements. Mango’s has been closed since March last year due to COVID-19.

He said the city should work to complete the brand, not destroy it.

Wallac dates back about six years to the roots of the South Beach problem, easing marijuana law and easing police enforcement in the city, banning off-duty police activities in nightclubs, and the 2014 Commission’s It goes back to voting. Abandoned plans for a $ 1 billion convention center campus on South Beach.

He said he supported the vision of transforming South Beach’s red-light district into a more cultural and residential space, but Mango failed to sell its assets and three plots near Collins Avenue to build a multipurpose development. He said he did.

“It’s not just a vision to shut it down,” Wallac said. “I agree that it is not sustainable in its current state and form. I agree accordingly.”

What do you think of the commissioner?

Responses to the plan were mixed among the city’s elected leaders.

Mark Samurian, who supports the previous call, said Gerber’s proposal would serve as a blueprint for the committee to plan the future of South Beach. But leaders must act quickly.

“We believe that we can have a thriving tourism and entertainment environment, not necessarily the current hard party environment. [entertainment district] Until 5 am, “he said. “The most important thing for me is that we have a fair and consistent policy and that we protect our residential area.”

Concerned about closing at 2am, Commissioner Michael Gongora said the Commission should work to revitalize Ocean Drive with art installations and cultural exhibits to attract a more sophisticated crowd. It was.

“I’m less likely to favor closing indoor facilities because they take people out of the street,” he said.

Ricky Ariola, who opposes the last call at 2 am, said the plan was over-focused on limiting business activities and did not provide a detailed vision of the future.

“These restrictions are not going to take us to the promised land,” he said. “We need to focus on programming. We need to focus on investing in this region.”

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