The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that Google won a decade-long patent dispute with Oracle


Google thumbainls inlucing Google Apps like Gmail, Maps, YouTube, Drive, Hangouts etc as seen on a phone screen. Google closeup logo displayed on a phone screen, smartphone on a keyboard is seen in this multiple exposure illustration, the company's symbol is globally recognized. Google, LLC is an American tech giant, a multinational technology company that specializes in Internet-related services and products, which include online advertising technologies, a search engine, cloud computing, software, and hardware. It is considered one of the Big Four technology companies in the US. Amsterdam, the Netherlands on October 22, 2020 (Photo by Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto)

Google thumbainls inlucing Google Apps like Gmail, Maps, YouTube, Drive, Hangouts etc as seen on a phone screen. Google closeup logo displayed on a phone screen, smartphone on a keyboard is seen in this multiple exposure illustration, the company’s symbol is globally recognized . Google, LLC is an American tech giant, a multinational technology company that specializes in Internet-related services and products, which include online advertising technologies, a search engine, cloud computing, software, and hardware. It is considered one of the Big Four technology companies in the US. Amsterdam, the Netherlands on October 22, 2020 (Photo by Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto)

Regarding whether Google’s use of Java API code in the development of Android infringes Oracle’s patents, the two companies have been in litigation for ten years. During this period, both sides have won and lost, and today the U.S. Supreme Court finally voted 6 to 2.overthrowFollowing the previous Federal Appeals Court’s ruling, Google did not constitute an infringement against Oracle. In the ruling, the court pointed out that Google’s copying of Java SE API code is a “lawful and fair use.”

For this victory, Google stated that “the concept of fair use can benefit everyone in the industry.” And Oracle’s Executive Vice President and Legal Counsel Dorian Daley bluntly said: “Google’s platform is getting bigger and bigger, and the market is expanding. The threshold is getting higher and higher, and the desire to compete with it is becoming more and more. It’s difficult. They stole Java and spent ten years in a lawsuit. Only a monopolist can do this. These actions are precisely the fundamental reason why the U.S. and global regulators want to review Google’s business practices.”

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