This designer celebrates the Ghanaian tradition with her energetic new textile line


“In Ghana, when someone wears a particular color or pattern, they know if they’re sad about their loved one, or if they’re older or younger,” says designer Chrisa. Amua says. “There is a culture of naming fabrics. It conveys emotions, wisdom and even humor.” London-born talent, a descendant of Ghana, has long been inspired. AdinkraA vast glossary of symbols that have been incorporated into local pottery, architecture and textiles for centuries. And now she is celebrating those motifs with Duality, her first collection of fabrics for Bernhard textiles. One pattern, Aya, features an abstracted fern (strength, toughness, elasticity emblem), while another pattern, Sella, reinterprets the iconography of acesegua’s wooden stools. I will. “Traditionally, these were the seats where only the royal family sat,” Amua explained the design and is now a staple of households throughout Ghana. On the other hand, she devised ink by applying pigment to the walnut veneer. This is a rethink of Ketepa, the cheeky Adinkra symbol that means “good bed” and symbolizes a good marriage. (Proper sleep is a relief.) “When people think of African-style fabrics, there are certain clichés or stereotypes,” says Africa by Design, a platform for manufacturers in sub-Saharan countries. Says Amua, the founder of. In 2017, we worked with African architect Tosin Oshinowo to create a conceptual headpiece for Lexus’ 2020 presentation at Design Miami. “But Africa is a very diverse continent. I think it’s important to stimulate people’s perspectives.” bernhardtdesign.com

Chrissa Amuah using Bernhardt Textiles fabric.

Chrissa Amuah using Bernhardt Textiles fabric.

The twill pattern is inspired by the fern, which is a symbol of elasticity.

The twill pattern is inspired by the fern, which is a symbol of elasticity.

Share her platform

Released in 2017, Designed by Africa Through online and face-to-face shows, 34 talented works from eight African countries are on display. “I’m trying to help them reach a larger audience,” says Amua, who founded the initiative after debuting his job at Salone del Mobile. There she noticed a shortage of sub-Saharan representatives. “There are many countries where safari, lion skin and zebra stripes are overlooked and associated.” Now she is recreating the conversation. “This is just the tip of the iceberg.” africabydesign.org

Stool by Ethiopian-American designer Jomo Tariq

Stool by Ethiopian-American designer Jomo Tariq

Chair by Inoussa Fasso
Chaired by Mali's Cheick Diallo

Chaired by Mali’s Cheick Diallo

Originally appeared Architectural digest

Posted on