Tropical Cyclone Elsa, the fifth named seasonal storm, forms. Will the truck bring it to Florida?


Tropical Cyclone Elsa was the fifth-named storm of the season, forming in the Atlantic Ocean early Thursday, leaving South Florida in uncertainty early next week.

However, the National Weather Service in South Florida has warned forecasters that Elsa’s course is still “very uncertain.”

“Florida’s interest needs to monitor forecast updates for this system, but given the uncertainty of long-term forecasts, it’s too early to determine if there could be an impact there next week. “The National Hurricane Center wrote at 5 am. Thursday’s recommendation.

According to the National Hurricane Center, Elsa is the earliest known fifth-named storm recorded in the Atlantic Basin during the “satellite” era that began in 1966. The previous record was previously held by Edouard on July 6, 2020.

Tropical cyclone warnings have been issued in St. Vincent and the Grenadines. Warnings are also valid in Barbados, Martinique and Saint Lucia. A tropical cyclone monitor was conducted Thursday at 8 am due to Grenada and its dependencies. The clock is also valid in Guadeloupe.

Forecasters expect additional surveillance and warnings to be issued later on Thursday, saying tropical cyclone conditions are likely to begin in the warnings and surveillance areas on Friday.

The state states that it has created an “emergency” storm plan in case Elsa comes to South Florida while the crew is still working in South Florida. Partially collapsed building on the surfside, Near Miami Beach, 140 people are still missing.

Where is Elsa now and where are you going?

Tropical Cyclone Elsa was the fifth-named storm of the season, forming in the Atlantic Ocean early Thursday, leaving South Florida in uncertainty early next week.

Tropical Cyclone Elsa was the fifth-named storm of the season, forming in the Atlantic Ocean early Thursday, leaving South Florida in uncertainty early next week.

Elsa was about 780 miles east-southeast of the Windward Islands at the time of Thursday’s 8am recommendation at the Hurricane Center.

The storm moves rapidly west at 25 mph, with a maximum wind speed of 40 mph and strong gusts, and is expected to increase in pace as it moves west-northwest the next day or so. Strong tropical cyclone winds extend up to 105 miles from the center.

According to the Hurricane Center, Elsa will move over warm water and is expected to be further strengthened the next day, but with the fast pace of storms and the “potential” of the mountains of the Greater Antilles. “Interaction” may limit the enhancement.

The system is projected to pass through some or more of the Windward Islands or southern Leeward Islands on Friday and then move to the eastern Caribbean Sea later on Friday. After that, we will move to near the south coast of Hispaniola on Saturday.

According to the Hurricane Center, there is still a lot of uncertainty in Elsa’s path after the third day. Some models turn north after interacting with Hispaniola. Other models take Elsa across western Cuba to the southeastern Gulf of Mexico.

Elsa is expected to rain 3 to 6 inches in the Windward Islands and southern Leeward Islands, including Barbados, on Friday, and can rain up to 8 inches in isolated areas. This rain can lead to isolated flash floods and landslides.

The Hurricane Center said there was a “risk of wind and rainfall effects” until early next week in parts of the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Hispaniola, Cuba, Turks and Caicos Islands and southeastern Bahamas.

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