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Dominion, Fox News Smartmatic Proceedings May Not Threaten Press Freedom

Do proceedings against false information impair freedom of speech? Speech proponents of syahrir maulana / iStock / Getty Images Plus Free have long believed that suing news agencies threatens freedom of speech. Democracy needs a press to report freely without fear or favor of the facts they see. However, recent proceedings against the press have shown that the First Amendment provides adequate protection of free speech, even if penalties are filed against the press. In recent years, falsehood has become a hot topic in public through outlets such as talk radio, cable TV channels, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Reddit, Instagram and other social media. These false spreads seem to have normalized the practice of spreading lies. The Dominion Voting System has sued Fox News in Dominion, a Smartmatic lawsuit against Fox News may not threaten press freedom https://theconversation.com/dominion-smartmatic-lawsuits-against-fox-news-may -not-threaten-freedom- of-the-press-155677 Sat, 27 Mar 2021 16:39:44 +0000 tag: theconversation.com, 2011: article / 155677 The gospel of one correction supporter. But in an era of rampant misinformation, such legal action may be more acceptable. Will the proceedings against misinformation by Nancy Costello, an associate professor of law at Michigan State University, undermine freedom of speech? Speech proponents of syahrir maulana / iStock / Getty Images Plus Free have long believed that suing news agencies threatens freedom of speech. Democracy needs a press to report freely without fear or favor of the facts they see. However, recent proceedings against the press have shown that the First Amendment provides adequate protection of free speech, even if penalties are filed against the press. In recent years, falsehood has become a hot topic in public through outlets such as talk radio, cable TV channels, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Reddit, Instagram and other social media. These false spreads seem to have normalized the practice of spreading lies. Dominion Voting System has sued Fox News in Dominion, Smartmatic lawsuit against Fox News may not threaten press freedom https://theconversation.com/dominion-smartmatic-lawsuits-against-fox-news-may -not-threaten-freedom- of-the-press-155677 Sat, 27 Mar 2021 16:32:15 +0000 tag: theconversation.com, 2011: article / 155677 The gospel of one correction supporter. But in an era of rampant misinformation, such legal action may be more acceptable. Will the proceedings against misinformation by Nancy Costello, an associate professor of law at Michigan State University, undermine freedom of speech? Speech proponents of syahrir maulana / iStock / Getty Images Plus Free have long believed that suing news agencies threatens freedom of speech. Democracy needs a press to report freely without fear or favor of the facts they see. However, recent proceedings against the press have shown that the First Amendment provides adequate protection of free speech, even if penalties are filed against the press. In recent years, falsehood has become a hot topic in public through outlets such as talk radio, cable TV channels, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Reddit, Instagram and other social media. These false spreads seem to have normalized the practice of spreading lies. Dominion Voting Systems has sued Fox News among US students, but is subject to change by COVID-19 https://theconversation.com/few-us-students-ever- repeat-a-grade-but-that- could-change-due-to-covid-19-143883 Sunday, March 28, 2021 15:02:41 + 0000 tag: theconversation.com, 2011: article / 143883 Coronavirus The turmoil in K-12 education caused by the pandemic has a major academic impact, especially for low-income children. Will it take more time for students to graduate because of the Pamela Davis-Kean pandemic, Professor of Psychology, University of Michigan? According to a poll conducted in the summer of 2020, valentinrussanov / E + via Getty Images, 54% of parents with school-aged children expressed concern that their children could fall behind school. Did. From the Northwest Evaluation Society, which conducts research and develops commonly used standardized tests, these fears suggest that they are well-founded, especially for children in low-income families. Based on the association’s findings and my own research on academic performance and socio-economic status, and based on these early predictions, a widespread and rapid switch to distance learning can have long-term academic adverse effects. I think it is highly sexual. One possibility is that this unprecedented confusion can increase the proportion of students who will repeat at least one grade at any given time. According to government data collected in 2018, only about 6% of US students needed to repeat their grades before graduating from high school before the COVID-19 pandemic. Potential efforts to get students to repeat their grades when they cannot prove that they have learned enough to advance to the next grade are based on some recent precedents. Under the Fall Prevention Act of 2001, reading comprehension up to grade 3 has become one of the federal government’s obligations for schools to receive a designated federal flow of funds. This federal law has brought about a wave of state-level law, combined with studies showing that children who could not yet read when repeating grades are better off. To date, a total of 16 states have enacted legislation prohibiting students from entering third grade until they are considered proficient in standardized reading tests. These state laws are different. Some states, like Florida, require students who aren’t reading enough to repeat their third grade completely. In other areas, such as Minnesota, we provide supplemental reading assistance until children go on to fourth grade and can read at what the state considers to be third grade. In reality, students usually do not repeat multiple grades. I think the academic impact of the prolonged distance learning that began in March 2020 is likely to be unequal. These results should weigh even more on growing students in the face of persistent financial difficulties. The habit of having children struggling to learn how to read repeat their third grade can be dangerous, even in good faith. For example, students who repeat grades can be stigmatized and less motivated to learn. Therefore, parents, educators, and policy makers should all strive to address the inevitable learning gaps that result from widespread distance learning during pandemics. [Like what you’ve read? Want more? Sign up for The Conversation’s daily newsletter.]This article has been republished by The Conversation, a non-profit news site aimed at sharing ideas from academic experts. It was written by Pamela Davis-Kean at the University of Michigan. Read More: Three Ways to Promote Social Skills for Children at Home It may prove impossible to spread K-12 face-to-face education in the United States until teachers feel safe It is funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Institute of Child Health Development (NICHD).

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